DEC Summer Book Club

This summer, educators everywhere deserve a break. So set up your hammock, grab a refreshing beverage and join us for the first DEC Summer Book Club. We’ll read 1-2 books throughout the summer that are NOT about design (but are design- and education-adjacent). Participants can choose from various low-stakes ways to engage in discussion, including the #dec-book-club Slack channel and multiple virtual meeting options.

The first book we’re reading is iGen: Why Today’s Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy–and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood–and What That Means for the Rest of Us by Jean M. Twenge. iGen provides data-backed insights into the behaviors and motivations of the generation of which most of our student bodies are now comprised. The book will generate many ideas for discussion such as how to communicate with Gen Z and how to better engage them in the classroom.

Join us!

If you’d like to participate:

We’ll begin discussions about the book starting in June with conversations in Slack and two virtual events:

Discussion 1
Chapters: Introduction through Ch. 5
Topics: Social interaction, attention span, mental health
Thursday, June 17
3:00 p.m. EDT
Zoom link

Discussion 2
Chapters: Ch. 6 through Conclusion
Topics: Safety in the classroom, job security and financial stability, looking ahead
Wednesday, June 30
3:00 p.m. EDT
Zoom link

We will also hold follow-up discussions in Slack about specific strategies and tactics for educators. All are welcome to participate in the Slack discussions, whether or not you are able to attend the meetings.


About the Book

iGen: Why Today’s Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy–and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood–and What That Means for the Rest of Us
By Jean M. Twenge

With generational divides wider than ever, parents, educators, and employers have an urgent need to understand today’s rising generation of teens and young adults.

Born in the mid-1990s up to the mid-2000s, iGen is the first generation to spend their entire adolescence in the age of the smartphone. With social media and texting replacing other activities, iGen spends less time with their friends in person—perhaps contributing to their unprecedented levels of anxiety, depression, and loneliness.

But technology is not the only thing that makes iGen distinct from every generation before them; they are also different in how they spend their time, how they behave, and in their attitudes toward religion, sexuality, and politics. They socialize in completely new ways, reject once sacred social taboos, and want different things from their lives and careers. More than previous generations, they are obsessed with safety, focused on tolerance, and have no patience for inequality.

With the first members of iGen just graduating from college, we all need to understand them: friends and family need to look out for them; businesses must figure out how to recruit them and sell to them; colleges and universities must know how to educate and guide them. And members of iGen also need to understand themselves as they communicate with their elders and explain their views to their older peers. Because where iGen goes, so goes our nation—and the world.

By aigaeducators
Published May 11, 2021
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