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AIGA Designer 2025

August 22, 2017 / By aigaeducators

AIGA periodically assesses the changing context for practice and implications for the pre-service, college education of designers and continuing education of professionals. It examines social, technological, and economic trends that will shape the environment in which designers work and identifies related competencies for successful practice.

AIGA Designer 2025 studied trends in a number of fields, changes in the nature of work, and advice of thought leaders from diverse practices. The result is a list of seven trends that are particularly evident in their influences on communication design. In the coming months, AIGA will develop these trend descriptions into briefing papers that offer more robust discussions of implications for design education and provide professional examples that illustrate design responses to emerging conditions. These trends also underpin the presentations and discussions of the educator-oriented programming at the 2017 AIGA National Conference in Minneapolis.

Included is a summary draft (PDF) describing seven trends and corresponding competencies for students and professionals. Also included are the design competencies previously negotiated between the AIGA and the National Association of Schools of Art and Design, the accrediting agency for college-level design programs in the United States. These competencies were approved by the AIGA Board of Directors and by the full membership of NASAD. They currently guide accreditation reviews of institutions with programs in communication design.

Questions? Contact us: designer2025@aiga.org

Learn more here (PDFs):
NASAD Competencies
AIGA Design 2025 Summary Document

COMMENTS
AIGA encourages thoughtful, responsible discourse. Please add comments judiciously, and refrain from maligning any individual, institution or body of work. Read our policy on commenting.
  • Eric Benson

    I would say climate change is a MUST that needs to be addressed in all design work. Less design=waste. Less overconsumption. There will need to be a shift in our economic models to value satisfaction over growth.